Spotlight on Wednesday

Once upon a time, there was an author who liked to talk to a character – a mighty Druid warrior – in her head, and share her meanderings with the world.

Okay “liked” might be too strong a word to use. “Endured talking to” might be better. And I’m not so sure “mighty Druid warrior” is really how we want to describe D – in fact, I’m pretty sure he’s been messing with my post drafts…

Ahem. . . To expand their reach, and because they liked to catalogue the curious – their very own cabinet of curiosities, so to speak – said author and Druid curated other bloggers. And so, “The Druid Tells the Tale” was born. It further evolved into “Interview with a Druid” or “The Druid asks the Questions,” to help shine a light on those bloggers they knew had something to say – and something to share with the world.

And lo, the people were happy, until the day the author, being fickle and lacking basic time management skills–

Ahem. . .

I mean, until the day the author, pressed in on all sides with real life obligations, let it fall to the wayside. And the people mourned.

But then, January came, and the author had a revelation! Spotlight posts! Every Wednesday! Scheduled in advance!

And so, the author and her character did rejoice, and live happily ever after.

The End.

Empty-stage-with-spotligh-004Okay, not quite, but as you can see, this is another “I’ve found a way to improve my life – or at least my blog – and I’m actually doing something organized about it” post.

I’ve said it before, but it bears repeating: I’m not a reblogger – at least, not a reliable one – and I’ve always had fun cataloguing a list of interesting tidbits, fanciful tales, and stories of interest – fact or fiction – for my readers. Of course, a few years into the blogging game, with a book out, another five million in various stages of creation and editing, not to mention a child who insists on getting older, and my time has withered away to nothing. So now, instead of being a curator of the interesting, I want to be a mouthpiece for it – and I need your help.

While I am trying to generate fans, I am aware that most of my readers are artists themselves, and all of them have something to say – something they want others to read and I want to help them do it, every Wednesday until I no longer have material.

What a Spotlight Means

It means shining a light on creative types – artists of all shapes and sizes. All and sundry are welcome – that is, if you write, paint, draw, document, picture, film, chronicle, pixelize, satirize, or in any other way create, you are welcome. You do not need to be selling anything to participate. Guests posts and interviews don’t need product to be successful, they just need you and your wonderful ideas.

And those wonderful ideas can be:

  • Press Releases. These include cover reveals and book launches – or any other type of launch.
  • Guest post. Topic: your passion. Share it with us. The post can be as detailed or as simple as you like. And no, I won’t make you talk with the Druid – of course I won’t stop you, either!
  • Interviews. Of course, for this one, you are going to have to talk to the Druid, because he’s the one asking the questions. Don’t worry, I’ll make him behave. Sort of. (Click to download example questions for writers)
  • Anything else – if you have the material, and it fits into my guidelines, then I’m happy to post (see: the WhoIsJessica Campaign).

The Dirty Details

I do not make a distinction between promoting traditional or indie-fueled content. All I care about is quality work. If the post is error free, compelling, something you’re proud of, and has at least one graphic provided, then it’s good for me.*

Posts will go live every Wednesday until further notice, and are scheduled on a first-come, first-served basis. If there is a particular time-frame you’d like a spotlight presented, let me know now so I can schedule accordingly.

Art and creativity are subjective and I reserve the right to reject any posts that I feel are not right for this blog. This includes, but is not limited to, posts/promotions of an extreme violent or sexual nature. That’s just not my audience.

*Posts must be edited before submission. Posts with grammar, spelling and syntax errors will be sent back for revision. I will not post anything riddled with errors unless said errors are central to the promotion.

Have something you want to Spotlight?

Use the form below to get started.

I will contact you by the email provided for more details and scheduling.

Broken

Courtesy Google Images

Courtesy Google Images

I am a collector of broken things. Usually I’m the one who did the breaking – butterfingers is a kind term for what happens when breakable objects come within reach of my hands. And broken things linger; I have a spot for them – a home – to wait until I get around to applying the glue that will make them whole again. It can take years before that happens, however. Once broken, it takes me a long time to find edges that match and patterns that connect. The piece waits to tell its story.

This is the story of a book I broke.

I didn’t know I was doing it at the time. In fact, I thought I was fixing it. I thought that the character that had been handed to me would make the book. I thought he would save it.

I wasn’t fond of him, that Druid interloper, but as his story spun itself out in my head, I knew he belonged. It was his story, just as much as it was mine – just as much as it was the story of the characters that populated it long before he made his appearance.

So I broke it – even as I kept writing the second and then the third book in the series, I was working with a mutilated thing, a limping shadow. It had so much potential, but I couldn’t find it. He felt out of place, as though he hadn’t had time to come to love the other characters as I did. And they – well, they resented him almost as much as I did. His edges and patterns did not match. I was afraid they never would.

I relegated it to a dusty corner of my mind, to wait with all the other broken things, until I could see it fully. It took a decade.

When the Druid stepped out of that corner, fully himself, I realized the book could be whole again. I sat down right away and started typing. I called it a revision at first, but it became obvious, as I wrote in my 500-word-a-day chunks, that it was more than that. I was putting the story back together, the way it was supposed to be told.

The edges – where the Druid started and the story he adopted ended – were mended. The patterns – the weave of his life as it affected the clan who made him – burned brightly. Instead of a jumble of pieces, it became a tapestry. Each thread was lovely but the tale they told left me breathless. Good or not – quality fiction or not – that it gave itself to me, and waited for me to fix it, means a great deal to me.

The story that was broken is now whole – and I love it. I even admire, just a little, the Druid who trusted me enough to wait until I was ready. Thanks, D.

This was for Prompts for the Promptless at Queen Creative: Kintsukuroi is a Japanese noun meaning “to repair with gold”; the art of repairing pottery with gold or silver lacquer and understanding that the piece is more beautiful for having been broken.

Check out these other “Broken” prompts: