Broken

Courtesy Google Images

Courtesy Google Images

I am a collector of broken things. Usually I’m the one who did the breaking – butterfingers is a kind term for what happens when breakable objects come within reach of my hands. And broken things linger; I have a spot for them – a home – to wait until I get around to applying the glue that will make them whole again. It can take years before that happens, however. Once broken, it takes me a long time to find edges that match and patterns that connect. The piece waits to tell its story.

This is the story of a book I broke.

I didn’t know I was doing it at the time. In fact, I thought I was fixing it. I thought that the character that had been handed to me would make the book. I thought he would save it.

I wasn’t fond of him, that Druid interloper, but as his story spun itself out in my head, I knew he belonged. It was his story, just as much as it was mine – just as much as it was the story of the characters that populated it long before he made his appearance.

So I broke it – even as I kept writing the second and then the third book in the series, I was working with a mutilated thing, a limping shadow. It had so much potential, but I couldn’t find it. He felt out of place, as though he hadn’t had time to come to love the other characters as I did. And they – well, they resented him almost as much as I did. His edges and patterns did not match. I was afraid they never would.

I relegated it to a dusty corner of my mind, to wait with all the other broken things, until I could see it fully. It took a decade.

When the Druid stepped out of that corner, fully himself, I realized the book could be whole again. I sat down right away and started typing. I called it a revision at first, but it became obvious, as I wrote in my 500-word-a-day chunks, that it was more than that. I was putting the story back together, the way it was supposed to be told.

The edges – where the Druid started and the story he adopted ended – were mended. The patterns – the weave of his life as it affected the clan who made him – burned brightly. Instead of a jumble of pieces, it became a tapestry. Each thread was lovely but the tale they told left me breathless. Good or not – quality fiction or not – that it gave itself to me, and waited for me to fix it, means a great deal to me.

The story that was broken is now whole – and I love it. I even admire, just a little, the Druid who trusted me enough to wait until I was ready. Thanks, D.

This was for Prompts for the Promptless at Queen Creative: Kintsukuroi is a Japanese noun meaning “to repair with gold”; the art of repairing pottery with gold or silver lacquer and understanding that the piece is more beautiful for having been broken.

Check out these other “Broken” prompts:

Terrifically told tales

A: So, how did your little boy’s night with Charlie go?

D: I’m not talking to you.

A: Then you won’t mind if I start the tale-telling?

D: What? Of course I mind! It’s Wednesday – that’s Druid’s Day, not A’s day to steal D’s thunder day.

A: Is Druid’s day anything like Durin’s Day?

D: . . .

A: Well?

D: I refuse to encourage you.

A: Like I need any help from you, Druid.

Read

A: First, go buy, and then go read, Echoes in Darkness. Andra at the Accidental Cootchie Mama, as well as several other wonderful writers (we’re looking at you Kate Shrewsday, among others!) contributed to this collection and you need to buy it now.

D: While A is a little on the demanding side, I must concur. There’s also this new phenomena called “Read Tuesday” it’s rather like Black Friday, but better.

A: I should hope so. I mean, I love shopping and all, but I’m not really down with trampling three old ladies and kid in a wheelchair just to get my hands on the latest gigipet-elmo-bracelet weaver hybrid toy. Those wheels hurt and don’t get me started on Grandma.

D: Are you quite finished?

A: Certainly, D – please, go on.

D: (Sigh) Head on over to Read Tuesday to find out what it is and what you can do to make it a success.

A: Well, that was rather anti-climactic.

D: (growl)

Wowzers

A: Since D is growling and that is a little more than horrific, check out Jack Flacco’s weekly feature, Women Who Wow. For the month of October he’s featuring women of the horror genre who really have it.

D: Also stop by The Literary Syndicate for Papi Z’s daily review of all things horrorThe list so far. . .

Interviews

D: Since A is slow and tardy and all around a p—

A: Watch it, Druid.

D: Since A has been delayed in getting questions out to my potential interviewees, please enjoy this interview of SK Nicholls by Marie Ann Bailey, at 1WriteWay.

Out and About

A: Our dear friend, and one of the few people who can make D behave, Briana Vedsted will be having her very first book signing on November 16. If you find yourself in Cortez Colorado on November 16, stop by the local library!

D: Woo hoo!

A: There you have it, folks – the praise of a Druid. Don’t get too loquacious on me, D.

D: (Snarl).

Check it out

A: I’m not really sure if he’s thinking the snarling and growling are good things. Regardless, as he’s off being a cave man sort, this one is for the ladies – check out The Nongenue. Because as they say, being a girl really isn’t pretty, but with these ladies, it is really really funny.

Just for Fun: Shopping

D: Cave man indeed . . .hmph. Two can play at this game. Want to know the most random shopping list I ever witnessed A create? No really, this one was beyond the beyond.

shopping listA: It was for a Halloween party, D.

D: You mean every day isn’t Halloween for you? I’ll have you know that Griffin Guts and Toe Jam are NOT a herb-crusted cheese ball with Tomato jam.

A: I don’t want to know how you know that. What about Dried Dragon Snot?

D: Oh A, everyone knows there’s no such thing as Dried Dragon Snot.

A: But the Griffins—

D: Dragon snot does dry, A. It burns. Forevermore.

A: This random bit of nonsense was brought to you by Prompts for the Promptless: Shopping! Visit Queen Creative today to read others!

D: Some of our favorites included

A: You heard it folks, endorsed by a Druid. Go. Read!

D: Don’t forget the Community storyboard prompt for this week, One Day!

A: And finally, a poem from another set of prompts, Friday Fictioneers, that really caught my attention. It speaks to what can lurk in the heart of an artist. Head over to Being the Memoirs of Helena-Hann Basquiat for The Sound Your Heart Makes.

D: Funny, I don’t have anything snarky to say to this.

A: It’s either a sign of the end –times, or a sign that it’s time to wrap this up. Good night, folks!